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Category:Madonna of the Rosary (Lotto) - Wikimedia Commons

Madonna with Child between Saints Flavian and Onuphrius is an oil painting by Lorenzo Lotto, signed and dated 1508, now in the Borghese Gallery, Rome, Italy. The painting was executed in the same year of the Recanati Polyptych , when Lotto moved to Rome (although it is not known if he had already painted it before leaving the Marche ).

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View: Lorenzo Lotto, The Virgin and Child with Saints. Read about this painting, learn the key facts and zoom in to discover more. Read about this painting, learn the key facts and zoom in to discover more.

Lorenzo Lotto | The Virgin and Child with Saints | NG2281 lorenzo lotto madonna

Madonna with St. Roch and St. Sebastian, 1522 by Lorenzo Lotto. High Renaissance. religious painting

Madonna and Child with Saint Peter Martyr, 1503 - Lorenzo

Madonna and Child with Saint Peter Martyr, 1503 by Lorenzo Lotto. High Renaissance. religious painting

Madonna with St. Roch and St. Sebastian, c.1522 - Lorenzo

Lorenzo Lotto’s relationship with Marche was intense and his paintings have profoundly influenced local artistic events. During his stay in the region, where he resided for a long time and where he died as an oblate in the Holy House of Loreto, Lorenzo Lotto produced works of great pictorial intensity and strong pathetic suggestion.

Madonna with Child between Sts. Flavian and Onuphrius

Lorenzo lotto, madonna del rosario, 1539, 18.jpg 3,456 × 2,304; 4.53 MB Lorenzo lotto, madonna del rosario, 1539, 19 firma.jpg 3,456 × 2,304; 5.98 MB Lorenzo lotto, madonna del rosario, 1539, 20 putti con petali di rosa.jpg 3,456 × 2,304; 4.98 MB

Lorenzo Lotto - Wikipedia

Lotto has depicted mother and child in twisting, angular poses, with the Madonna balancing in contrapposto, while the kneeling couple are shown in profile, in rigid, upright positions. This division serves to emphasize the contrast between the earthly and the spiritual realms, but might also be explained by the fact that the figures of the Virgin and her son are thought to have been borrowed